You can’t get your head around what ‘disabled language’ means in the UK

It’s a common phrase, but in the U.K., it’s also an obscure word, meaning something like a person who can’t speak English.It’s the opposite of the English-speaking world’s standard phrase for “disabled person.”If you’re like most people in the country, you’re probably familiar with the term, which has become a key part of the language […]

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Disabled Language for iPad: How to use a keyboard shortcut

Disabled language for iPad provides the ability to use keyboard shortcuts in certain circumstances.You can access the keyboard shortcut with a key combination of ‘A’, ‘E’, ‘L’, ‘K’ or ‘R’ to activate the keyboard.The accessibility community has been very helpful in creating this feature, with over 150 community members contributing to the project.The disabled language […]

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How to use an eraser to erase a disability word

When I first started to use my disability language on Twitter, it was with the intent of trying to keep my account updated.I was trying to get new followers and to keep up with my colleagues and friends.Then, one day, I saw a tweet from @sarabie_sarah, a writer for the Guardian, where she said, “I […]

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